Casualties

Axis & Allies D-Day begins as Operation Overlord, the invasion of German-held Normandy, is underway -- 130,000 soldiers of the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States are poised to assault Fortress Europe. You and your fellow world powers control their fates.
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Pete E
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:35 am

Casualties

Post by Pete E » Sat Aug 17, 2013 10:40 pm

I do a lot of solo wargaming and one thing I try to avoid, when I can, is choosing which units are destroyed. I prefer the "Fog of War" or, more exactly, the "Fog of Dice". D-Day is a great game that offers this opportunity because there are basically only three weapon systems involved: Infantry, Artillery, and Tanks. Because there can only be a maximum of eight units in a zone, it is possible to calculate a finite combination of weapon systems (although adding in a blockhouse complicates matters).

I'm not a mathematician so if this doesn't make sense please let me know. But taking an easy example of 6 units in a zone, there are only three weapon system combinations: 4-1-1, 3-2-1, 2-2-2. Using a D12 I break things done as such:

4 units: Roll 1-8
1 unit: Roll 9-10
1 unit: Roll 11-12

3 units: Roll 1-6
2 units: Roll 7-10
1 unit: Roll 11-12

2 units: Roll 1-4
2 units: Roll 5-8
2 units: Roll 9-12

In the first example, if there are 4 infantry, 1 artillery, and 1 tank, every roll that is a 1-8 on a subsequent roll after the initial hit, is alloted to an infantry unit; a roll of 9-10 is allocated to an artillery unit (I assign units based on lethality when all things are equal: Infantry, Artillery, Tank, Blockhouse); a roll of 11-12 destroys a tank. If there were three D12 rolls of the number 5, for example, it would mean three individual infantry units were destroyed and not the same unit hit three times (life is complicated enough without introducing it here as well). If a blockhouse is involved I always assign it the #12. So in this example, if there was a blockhouse the tank would be destroyed on a roll of 11 only and the block house 12. To review: After every hit using a D6, you roll a D12 to see who is destroyed. And just to clarify further, if using this first example there were four tanks, they would be assigned the D12 rolls of 1-8; infantry 9-10, and artillery 11-12.

Once you set up charts for each possible combination it's easy going forward. And I'd like to reiterate that my analytical left-brain collapsed years ago trying to calculate if a 6-pack of beer was a better value than a 12-pack. So help me out to improve or admonish what I've tried to put forth as a way to not "pick 'n choose" who gets it. Afterall, it fun to be a general of war, but not the god of war.
Thanks,
Pete

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elbowsanchez
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Re: Casualties

Post by elbowsanchez » Sat Apr 16, 2016 7:20 pm

Cool ideas. Thank you for sharing them.
-The evil Bert & friend

Pete E
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 8:35 am

Re: Casualties

Post by Pete E » Fri Aug 19, 2016 11:34 am

Greetings,
Here is a further refinement of "Who is Hit" from my first post. If you recall (or re-read) because D-Day allows only a maximum of eight units per zone per side we can figure out what units are hit. Once you've determined what type of unit was hit, you can break it down further to see whom in that unit was hit. An example will provide a clearer picture.

In the D-Day Operations Manual on pages 11-12, Larry has given us an example of the battle of Caen. In his example the Germans score three hits against the British force. Using our earlier charts we determine all three hits land on the four British artillery units. Now we want to find out which of the four artillery units were potentially struck fatally by the three German hits. To do this we must construct another chart. In this example when these four artillery units are subjected to D12 rolls we see each artillery piece can be categorized by three numbers: 1-3, 4-6, 7-9, and 10-12. Because there were three German hits, we roll three D12 and note the numbers rolled are 2, 3 and 7. In our example, the first artillery piece is hit twice (rolls of 2-3 falls within 1-3) and the remaining hit occurs in the third artillery (roll of 7 falls within 7-9). The three German hits only yield two casualties, not three, and the battle continues.

The obvious drawback to this refinement is the time it takes to determine exactly who is hit. But if you're a solo wargamer, taking the casualty decision out of your hands creates a fairness and satisfaction I can find in no other manner. Happy gaming!
Pete

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