Global National Advantages

Link up A&A Pacific 1940 and Europe 1940, and you've got Axis & Allies Global 1940.
NinjaEskimo012
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 3:33 am

Re: Global National Advantages

Post by NinjaEskimo012 » Mon Dec 26, 2016 1:04 pm

New/Revised National Advantages:

Japan:
1. Tokyo Express: The Japanese High Command used destroyer convoys to ferry infantry. Allied sailors dubbed this the “Tokyo Express.”
Each of your Screen Destroyers (DD) may act as a transport for 1 Infantry unit. These Destroyers follow the same rules for loading and offloading units as Transports, but do not incur a combat penalty.

2. Kaiten Torpedoes: In recognition of the unfavorable progress of the war, towards the end of 1943 the Japanese high command considered suggestions for various suicide craft. Kamikaze planes were somewhat successful, and the second most successful were the Kaiten torpedoes.
Your Submarines and Screen Destroyers (DD) may make an Opening Fire strike using their defensive combat values before the first cycle of combat when defending in SZs with originally (which are also currently) Japanese-held islands or territories, as well as in sea zones where Kamikaze Attacks may be made. Hits from these defensive Opening Fire strikes may only be taken by surface ships.

3. Naval Night Fighting Skills: Unlike their American counterparts, Japanese sailors drilled and practiced night fighting extensively, conducting frequent live-fire night gunnery drills and exercises.
Your Battleships and Cruisers (CB, CA, and CL) fire twice in the first round of combat when attacking; this requires the Japanese player's vocalization of a "Night Attack!"

4. Most Powerful Battleships: The Yamato-class battleships were the heaviest battleships ever constructed, and the class carried the largest naval artillery ever fitted to a warship; plans for a Super-Yamato class were scrapped when the Japan High Command realized the overambitious nature of their capital ship program.
You may purchase up to 2 Battleships per game for 26 IPCs; marked with an NCM, they attack and defend on a roll of 5 or less, take 3 hits to sink, and have a naval 4AA, but in all other respects act as Battleships.

5. Dug-In Defenders: Many Japanese troops defending Pacific islands elected to die in their bunkers rather than surrender.
All your Infantry on islands defend on a 3 for the first round of combat; if the islands were originally Japanese-controlled, your Infantry defend on a 3 for the entire battle.

6. Banzai Attacks: A fearsome rallying cry of the Imperial Japanese Army, “Banzai!” meant “May you live ten thousand years.”
Vocalization of "Banzai!" when Japanese attack with solely Infantry as ground units, or when pressing an attack after they are reduced to just Infantry as ground units, results in +1 attack for those Japanese Infantry; however, the Japanese player must reduce said Infantry by 1 unit before rolling recommences.



United States:
1. Radar: In February 1940, Great Britain developed the resonant-cavity magnetron, capable of producing microwave power in the kilowatt range, opening the path to second-generation radar systems; Prime Minister Winston Churchill directed that the technology secrets of Great Britain be shared with the United States and the Commonwealth Nations.
Same as the UK's "Radar" National Advantage, but only if they have it activated; if not, re-roll for a different National Advantage.

2. Dawn of the Supercarrier: In their original configuration, the Midway-class ships had an airwing of almost 130 aircraft.
After Turn 7, you may build up to 2 Midway-class Carriers (CVB) for 26 IPCs; labelled U.S.S. Midway with paper slips, they may carry 3 fighter-sized planes, attack at 0, defend at 2, have a naval 3AA, and take 3 hits to sink. When only damaged once, they may still fully support 2 aircraft; however, Midway-class Carriers cannot fit through the Panama Canal.

3. US Marine Corps: “Send in the Marines!” was a popular U.S. rallying cry in World War II.
You may purchase Marines for 4 IPCs. Indicated by NCMs placed under Infantry pieces, they attack at 2 during an amphibious assault, or 3 for the first round when paired with an Artillery unit; in all other respects, they act as normal Infantry units, but may only serve in airborne capacities when assaulting an island (group).

4. Fast Carrier Task Force: The U.S.S. Independence was the first of nine light carriers constructed on Cleveland-class cruiser hulls.
Your Light Carriers (CVL) may move 3 when paired with a Light Cruiser (CL) and 1 other Cruiser (CB, CA, or CL).

5. Superfortresses: The B-29 Superfortress flew higher and packed more of a punch than any other plane in the U.S. arsenal.
Your Strategic Bombers attack as heavy bombers and are immune to antiaircraft fire, but their attack is reduced to 3. If you choose to risk the AA guns, you may attack at 4 as normal. Your Strategic Bombers are still susceptible to interceptors. You keep the result of both dice when combined with the Heavy Bombers development.

6. 101st Airborne: With its fleets of trucks, the U.S. Army was the most mobile force of soldiers in World War II.
Strategic Bombers may act as an airborne transport for one Infantry unit when designated by an NCM upon purchase. These bomber transports reduce their attack and defense by one, but still retain their offensive dogfighting capabilities; when dropping paratroopers they may not participate in normal combat (they leave immediately after defensive AA gun fire). Airborne troops delivered in this manner may initiate combat rather than simply supporting an existing combat, but their target territory must be a front-line territory. When combined with the Paratrooper development, transport bombers increased their paratrooper capacity to two units, which may now include Marines for paradrops on an island (group). Marines dropped in this fashion that are also joined by amphibious forces are awarded their amphibious assault attack bonus, but may not pair up with any Artillery for the duration of the battle. Paratroopers may never retreat from a battle.

NinjaEskimo012
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 3:33 am

Re: Global National Advantages

Post by NinjaEskimo012 » Mon Dec 26, 2016 2:06 pm

New/Revised National Advantages:

*I forgot to mention, I allow the Chinese to buy American AA guns like they do Artillery when the Burma Road is open.*
*Also, China only has 3 National Advantages, but they still are 1/6 chance of rolling when divying up NAs at the beginning of the game.*
China:
1. Mao Zedong: During the Long March, Mao jostled his way through the Communist Party's ranks until he became head of the party; along the way, his impassioned speeches to the Chinese peasantry drew many followers.”
You produce 1 free Infantry unit per turn, and an additional 1 in Suiyuyan if Chinese forces are present.

2. Chiang Kai-shek: With the international community backing the legitimacy of the Chinese Nationalist Government, Chiang Kai-shek's forces were well provisioned by American and British aid coming over the Himalayas and along the Burma Road.
You produce 1 free Infantry unit per turn, or 1 free Artillery/AA gun in Szechwan (as permitted).

3. Flying Tigers: Flying Tiger fighter pilots earned official credit, and received combat bonuses, for destroying 296 enemy aircraft, while losing only 14 pilots in combat.
The Chinese fighter may attack at 4 OR defend at 5 (choose at beginning of game), and retreat while on defense if it so chooses.



United Kingdom:
1. Radar: In February 1940, Great Britain developed the resonant-cavity magnetron, capable of producing microwave power in the kilowatt range, opening the path to second-generation radar systems; Prime Minister Winston Churchill directed that the technology secrets of Great Britain be shared with the United States and the Commonwealth Nations.
Your AA guns in UK-held territories with at least 1 facility (including facility's) hit on a 2; naval-AA for Fleet Carriers and Battleships hit on a 2. Required for US and ANZAC/Commonwealth "Radar" National Advantages.

2. Joint Strike: The most powerful strike in the war was the joint Allied assault on Normandy. The planning required to launch this simultaneous invasion has never been equaled.
Once during the game, on your turn, you may declare a joint strike. You complete your turn as normal, except you skip your Combat Move and Conduct Combat phases. (Any of your units may move on your Non-combat Move phase.) On the U.S.’s turn, the U.S.’s player can move any of your units during his or her Combat Move phase and Conduct Combat with them, as if they belonged to the U.S. You and the U.S.’s player must agree on attacking casualties, or the opposing player gets to choose them. This is in addition to any Free French Forces or Commonwealth troops that have the pertinent National Advantages activated.

3. Enigma Decoded: Working in a secret facility in Bletchley Park, Alan Turing’s cryptographers broke the codes of the Nazi Enigma machines. They could then send false messages back.
Once per game, when Germany finishes its combat move phase but before its conduct combat phase, you may make one special move. You may move any number of your units from an adjacent space into any one friendly space being attacked by Germany. Alternatively, you may move any number of your units from a space being attacked by Germany into an adjacent friendly space, but you must leave at least one unit behind. This special move otherwise follows the rules for a noncombat move. If your units survive, they remain in the space to which they were moved.

4. American Lend-Lease Policy: The "Act to Promote the Defense of the United States" effectively ended the United States' pretense of neutrality and was a decisive step away from non-interventionist policy, which had dominated United States foreign relations since 1931.
The UK (Europe) receives 5 IPCs representing aid and supplies from the United States so long as SZ103, SZ109, and SZ118 remain free of Axis warships (the latter two acting as pseudo-convoy routes). This amount is increased to 10 IPCs once the United States declares war against the European Axis powers. (Add 2 German Submarines to SZ113 at start of game.)

5. French Government in Exile: Charles de Gaulle's speech "Appeal of 18 June" had a stirring effect on morale throughout France and its colonies.
The UK may utilize (Free) French territories as they do the Dutch East Indies.

6. Colonial Garrison: World War II represented the height of the United Kingdom’s colonial empire. Two decades later, the Commonwealth was a shadow of its world-spanning former self.
You begin the game with one additional Minor Industrial Complex in any UK-controlled territory with an income value of at least 2. (You can’t have more than one industrial complex in a territory.)

NinjaEskimo012
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Dec 17, 2016 3:33 am

Re: Global National Advantages

Post by NinjaEskimo012 » Mon Dec 26, 2016 3:44 pm

New/Revised National Advantages:

Italy:
1. Alpine Line: The Alpine Wall was an Italian system of fortifications along the 1851 km of Italy's northern frontier. Built in the years leading up to World War II at the direction of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, the defensive line faced France, Switzerland, Austria and Yugoslavia.
Up to 4 Infantry and/or Artillery receive +1 defense for the first round of combat when defending Northern Italy from an attack out of France, Switzerland, Greater Southern Germany, or Yugoslavia.

2. Franco's Reparations: After largely funding Francisco Franco's fascist revolution in the Spanish Civil War, Mussolini expected him to become subservient to the Italian Empire after defeating the Royalists; Franco declined.
Spain is worth 4 IPCs, and Italy receives 2 IPC in reparations per turn. The Allies may demand that payments halt at any time, but then Italy may invade Spain with no consequence to the global neutral countries. 2 Spanish Infantry defect to become part of any invading Italian force (sympathetic Spanish soldiers), and Italy places a Minor Industrial Complex, Air Base, and Naval Base upon capture of Spain.

3. The Desert Fox: Rommel's leadership of German and Italian forces in the North African Campaign established his reputation as one of the most able tank commanders of the war, and earned him the nickname der Wüstenfuchs, "the Desert Fox".
On your second turn you may place 1 German Tank and 1 German Mechanized Infantry in Tobruk. These two German units move as Italian units, and allow other German units that started in same territory as them that turn to move as Italian units as well. Representing German Field Marshall Rommel's command of the Afrikan Korps, these two German units (identified by Italian NCMs) give Italian and German infantry +1 attack for the first round of combat, until one of these command units is lost.

4. Self-Propelled Guns: The Italians were pioneers in the use of self-propelled guns, both in close support and anti-tank roles.
Your Artillery may move 2 spaces per turn, but may not blitz unless Rommel accompanies them.

5. "Et tu, Bruté?": On 25 July, 1943, the Grand Council of Fascism voted to limit the power of Italian dictator Benito Mussolini and handed control of the Italian armed forces over to King Victor Emmanuel III. The next day Mussolini met with the King, was dismissed as prime minister, and was then imprisoned.
All Italian forces unaccompanied by German forces join the Allies if Southern Italy is captured, but won't revert to Axis if Germany retakes Rome; instead, Germany will fight on alone. (+4 infantry in Southern Italy upon Allied capture; Italy retains control of its income and purchases.)

6. Submarine Base: The Italian Navy established a submarine base at Bordeaux, code named BETASOM, and thirty two Italian submarines participated in the Battle of the Atlantic.
You may build 1 Submarine per turn in SZ105 without an Industrial Complex if Normandy/Bordeaux is Axis-controlled, and in addition to the normal maximum production placement if controlled by Italy.



*Like China, ANZAC only has 3 National Advantages, but they still are 1/6 chance of rolling when divying up NAs at the beginning of the game.*
ANZAC:
1. Canada: Over the course of the war, more than 1.1 million Canadians served in the Canadian Army, Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Air Force, and in forces across the Commonwealth.
*As per the idea presented by oztea: http://www.axisandallies.org/forums/ind ... ic=20629.0*
Adjustments: 1) Air Base is positioned on the island of Labrador (UK-owned) in SZ106 instead of in Ontario. 2) Artillery present in Quebec, but a 2nd Destroyer replaces the Cruiser in SZ106, and no Destroyer in SZ120. 3) Canadian NO changed to encompass all Allied convoys in just the North Atlantic (including the pseudo-convoy routes in the British "American Lend-Lease" NA). 4) Add 1 German Submarine each in SZ104 and SZ112.

2. Strategic Orders: With ANZAC divisions stationed in Egypt and Malaya and supporting US Navy operations in the South Pacific, and Canadian forces assaulting the beaches of Normandy alongside British and American troops, the Commonwealth nations of the British Empire were more than used to fighting with their allies.
ANZAC/Commonwealth troops may move as units of the US or UK so long as they are accompanied by units of that nation (e.g. ANZAC fighters may attack with (and as) US fighters on the US's turn).

3. Radar: In February 1940, Great Britain developed the resonant-cavity magnetron, capable of producing microwave power in the kilowatt range, opening the path to second-generation radar systems; Prime Minister Winston Churchill directed that the technology secrets of Great Britain be shared with the United States and the Commonwealth Nations.
Same as UK radar, but UK activation of "Radar" National Advantage required, otherwise reroll for National Advantage selection.



France:
1. Maginot Line: Wary of Germany's intentions following the Great War, the French fortified their border with Germany, building numerous forts and defensive bulwarks that stretched from Switzerland to Belgium.
Up to 7 French Infantry and/or Artillery receive +1 defense for the first round of combat when defending France against an attack made with units from Western Germany or Switzerland (this defense bonus stacks with an Artillery's defensive pairing bonus).

2. Alpine Line: The Alpine Line was the component of the Maginot Line that defended the Maritime Alps, the Cottian Alps and the Graian Alps in the southeastern portion of France.
Up to 3 French Infantry and/or Artillery receive +1 defense for the first round of combat when defending France from an attack made with units from Northern Italy (this defense bonus stacks with an Artillery's defensive pairing bonus).

3. French Resistance: Resistance cells were small groups of armed men and women who, in addition to their guerrilla warfare activities, were also publishers of underground newspapers, providers of first-hand intelligence information, and maintainers of escape networks that helped Allied soldiers and airmen trapped behind enemy lines.
You may take 2 actions per turn (cause 1 damage to a facility or roll a 1 to destroy one Axis Infantry or Artillery unit in occupied French homeland).

4. Free French Forces: The Free French fought Axis and Vichy regime troops and served on battlefronts everywhere from the Middle East to Indochina and North Africa. The Free French Navy operated as an auxiliary force to the Royal Navy and, in the North Atlantic, to the Royal Canadian Navy.
French forces may act in every regard as units of the UK, a Commonwealth nation, or the US so long as they are accompanied by units of that nation (e.g. French infantry may attack alongside British forces on the UK's turn).

5. Vichy France: Puppet government gives German occupiers legitimacy.
German control of Normandy/Bordeaux and France immediately activates the collaborator government (controlled by the German player during Germany's turn); German control of Paris is required to maintain the Vichy government. Southern France becomes the Vichy French capital, with units in and adjacent to Southern France becoming Vichy French (marked with a German NCM); all other French forces not accompanied by Allied units immediately roll a die, converting to Vichy French forces on a roll of 1 or 2. The Vichy French government may collect IPCs from all Vichy French territories and produce Vichy units in Southern France. The Vichy French government is neutral toward the non-Free French Allies, and as such may only attack/claim Free French territories and Pro-Axis neutral countries (both French & German NCMs) unless otherwise provoked. Vichy units unaccompanied by German units must roll higher than a 2 in order to attack as directed. Reduces French Resistance actions by 1 per turn, and reduces French reinforcements when Allied forces liberate France by 1 IPC per turn; revert to normal French forces if Paris held by Allies for an entire round (Free French forces collect income so long as France is liberated/under Allied control.

6. Prep for D-Day: The French Resistance played a significant role in facilitating the Allies' rapid advance through France following the invasion of Normandy on 6 June 1944 by providing military intelligence on the German defenses known as the Atlantic Wall and on Wehrmacht deployments and orders of battle. The Résistance also planned, coordinated, and executed acts of sabotage on the electrical power grid, transport facilities, and telecommunications networks
After the first Allied landing in Normandy/Bordeaux, the first Axis counterattack(s) by land are limited to Infantry and Artillery units to reflect the French Resistance's destruction of key bridges and railroads leading to the front.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 13 guests