Larry Harris' Tournament Rules ((All parts))

Here are the Tournment Rules for Revised Axis & Allies
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Larry Harris' Tournament Rules ((All parts))

Post by Larry » Wed May 19, 2004 11:46 pm

Spring 1942: The fleet at Pearl Harbor rebuilds from the ruins. Britons stare across the Channel to an occupied France. West of Moscow, Soviet troops dig out from a brutal winter on the Russian front. Greenhorn American soldiers leave their birthplaces for the first time; unclear whether they’ll see the home fires burn again. They face a world at war.

Their fates are in your hands. You and your fellow world leaders control the destinies of literally million of soldiers. One side is the Axis: Germany and Japan. Challenging their expansionism are the Allies: the Soviet Union (U.S.S.R.), the United Kingdom (U.K.) and the United States (U.S.). You must work as a team within your alliance, coordinating and negotiating toward your goals. As you recreate the greatest war the world has ever known, one side will emerge victorious, and history will never be the same.

HOW THE WAR IS WON
Axis & Allies can be played by up to five players. Each of you will control one or more world powers. On your turn, you build, deploy, maneuver, and command army divisions, air wings, and naval fleets to loosen your foes’ hold on their territories. On your opponents’ turns, they will bring their forces against you. The more territories you hold, the more weapons you can build; and the more powerful those weapons can be.

At the start of the game, decide whether you want to play to a minor victory, moderate victory (recommended for tournament play), major victory, or total victory (depending on how long you want to play). On the map are twelve victory cities crucial to the war effort. As the game begins, each side controls six of these cities. The Allies begin the game controlling Washington, London, Leningrad, Moscow, Calcutta, and Los Angeles. The Axis powers begin the game controlling Berlin, Paris, Rome, Shanghai, Manila, and Tokyo. When, at the end of a complete round of play (after the completion of the U.S. turn), your side controls a set number of victory cities, you win the war.

Victory Victory
Cities Controlled Conditions
8 Minor
9 Moderate (recommended for tournament play)
10 Major
12 Total


THE COMBATANTS
One or more players take the side of the Axis, and one or more play the Allis. In a five-player game, each player controls one world power. If fewer people play, some will control more than one power.

If you control more than one power, keep those powers’ income and units separate. You can conduct operations for only one power at a time.

{No changes to section defining setup for two, three, four or five-player games on page 4, nor to page 5 of the manual}

SETUP
Once you’ve decided who will play which power, prepare the game for play. It contains the following components.

Game Board
The game board is a map of the world, circa 1942. It is divided into spaces, either territories (on land) or sea zones, separated by border lines. Place the game board in the center of the table. The Allied players should sit near its top (northern) edge, and the Axis players should sit along the bottom (southern) edge.

Battle Board and Dice
The battle board is large card with columns that list attacking and defending units and their combat strength. When combat occurs, the players involved place their units on the battle board. Combat is resolved by rolling dice. Place the battle board next to the game board, and the dice next to the battle board.

Control Markers
Control markers indicate status in the game. They mark conquered territories and record other information on the game’s charts.

Punch out and take all control markers that belong to your power.

Victory Cities Chart
This chart shows which cities each power controls. For each power you’re playing, place one of your control markers on each of the matching circles. Ownership may change during the game.

National Production Chart
This chart keeps track of each power's national production level during the game. Place the National Production Chart next to the game board. For each power you’re playing, place one of your control markers on the matching space on the chart. This is the power’s starting national production level. (It matches the total of the circled numbers in territories your control.) Choose one player to be in charge of tracking changes in national production throughout the game.

Industrial Production Certificates
These are the money of the game, representing capacity for military production. Separate the Industrial Production Certificates (IPCs) by denomination (1, 5, and 10) and distribute a starting total to each power as follows. (These amounts are equal to each power’s beginning national production level.) Choose one player to be the banker, and give all remaining IPCs to that player.

Power: IPCs
Soviet Union: 24
Germany: 40
United Kingdom 30
Japan: 30
United States: 42



Aircraft Movement Markers
These numbered markers show how many spaces an air unit has moved. Punch out the markers before you start. Whenever you move an air unit into combat, place a numbered marker beneath it, so that you know how many spaces it can move later in the turn. You also use these to show at which points in the move the air unit encounters antiaircraft gun fire.

Weapons Development Chart
This chart tracks each power’s technological advances in weaponry. Whenever you develop new weapons, place a control marker beside the appropriate weapon type on the chart.

Reference Charts
Take the Reference Chart for your power. A Reference Chart shows the name of the power, its alliance (Axis or Allies), its piece color, its emblem, and order of play. It also lists the available units, their statistics, and their starting numbers and locations in the game.

Combat Forces
Take the plastic pieces that represent your power’s combat units. Each power is color-coded as follows.
Power: Color
Soviet Union: Red
Germany: Gray
United Kingdom: Tan
Japan: Orange
United States: Green

Two other kinds of units, antiaircraft guns and industrial complexes, are light gray and not color-coded to a particular power. These can change hands during play.

Your Reference Chart tells you the number and kind of units to be placed in your territories and sea zones. In the example of Germany’s Reference Chart, you can see that the first box lists three infantry in the territory of Germany. Place all the indicated units as listed. The shaded bar on the line with the words SEA UNITS lists numbered sea zones. Place the sea units listed below those numbers in the corresponding sea zones.

Plastic Chips
Use these to save space in overcrowded territories and sea zones. White chips represent one combat unit each and red chips, five units each. For example, if you wanted to place seven infantry on a space, you would stack up one red chip, one white chip and one infantry unit on top. (If you don’t have enough pieces to top off all your stacks, simply use any identifying item, such as a piece of paper with the unit type written on it. The number of stacks is not limited by the number of plastic pieces available.

Marshaling Circles and Cards
Punch out the ten numbered marshaling cards and place them in a stack next to the game board. Punch out the circles with matching numbers and place them next to these. When you want to put more units in a space than will fit, instead place one of the numbered marshaling circles in that space. Then place your excess units on the corresponding marshaling card near the game board. These units are considered to be in the space containing the matching numbered circle.

Spaces On The Game Board


The colors of the territories on the game board show which power controls them at the start of the game. Each power has its own color, as follows
Power Color
Soviet Union Red
Germany Gray
United Kingdom Tan
Japan Orange
United States Green

All other spaces are Neutral, not aligned with any power.

Most territories have an income value ranging from 1 to 12. This is the number of IPCs they produce each turn for their controller. A few territories, such as Gibraltar, have no income value.

Units can move between adjacent spaces (those that share a common border). The game board wraps around horizontally. Territories and sea zones on the right edge of the board are adjacent to territories and sea zones on the left edge, as indicated by corresponding letters along the board edges (A connects to A. B to B, and son on). The top and bottom edges of the board do not wrap around.

All territories exist in one of three conditions.
Friendly: Controlled by you or a friendly power (one on your side).
Hostile: Controlled by an enemy power (one on the opposing side).
Neutral: Not controlled by any power. Control of neutral territories never changes.

Sea zones are either friendly (contain friendly units) or hostile (contain enemy units). They are never neutral. An unoccupied sea zone is friendly to everyone.

Neutral Territories: Neutral territories (such as Turkey, Mongolia, or Sahara) are pale colored. They represent areas that are impassable for political or geographic reasons. You cannot attack neutral territories, move through them, or move over them with air units. Neutral territories don’t have income values.

Islands:
An island is a territory located entirely inside one sea zone. A sea zone can contain at most one group of islands, which is considered one territory. It is not possible to split up land-based units so that they’re on different islands in the same group.

Canals
There are two canals on the game board, artificial waterways that connect two larger bodies of water. The Panama Canal connects the Pacific Ocean (sea zone 20) to the Atlantic Ocean (sea zone 19), while the Suez Canal connects the Mediterranean Sea (sea zone 15) to the Indian Ocean (sea zone 34). A canal is not considered a space, so it doesn’t block land movement: Land units can move freely between Trans-Jordan and Anglo-Egypt. Panama is one territory: no land movement points are required to cross the canal within Panama.

If you want to move sea units through a canal, your side (but not necessarily your power) must control it at the start of your turn (that is, you can’t use it the turn you capture it). The side that controls Panama controls the Panama Canal. The side that controls both Anglo-Egypt and Trans-Jordan controls the Suez Canal. If one side controls Anglo-Egypt and the other controls Trans-Jordan, the Suez is closed to sea units.

ORDER OF PLAY
Axis & Allies is played in rounds. A round consists of each power taking a turn, and then a check to see if one side or the other has won the game.

Order of Play
1. Soviet Union
2. Germany
3. United Kingdom
4. Japan
5. United States
6. Check for victory

Your power’s turn consists of seven phases, which take place in a fixed sequence. You must collect income if you can, but all other parts of the turn sequence are voluntary. When you finish the collect income phase, your turn is over. Play then passes to the next power. When every power has completed a turn, if no side has won, begin a new round of play.

Turn Sequence
1. Develop weapons
2. Purchase units
3. Combat move
4. Conduct combat
5. Noncombat move
6. Mobilize new units
7. Collect income

PHASE 1:
DEVELOP WEAPONS
In this phase, you can develop sophisticated weaponry. You do so by buying research dice that give you a chance for a scientific breakthrough. Each research die you roll gives you an additional chance for new weapons development. Any number of powers may develop the same weapons, but powers can’t share their technology. Each research die you buy costs 5 IPCs.

Develop Weapons Sequence
1. Choose a development
2. Buy research dice
3. Roll research dice
4. Mark developments

Step 1: Choose a Development
Refer to the Weapons Development Chart and decide which weapons development you wish to research this turn (such as Super Submarines). You can choose only one development each turn.

Step 2: Buy Research Dice
Each die costs 5 IPCs. Buy as many as you wish. Research dice don’t carry over to later turns.

Step 3: Roll Research Dice
Roll all your dice for the turn (at the same time), and then check the Weapons Development Chart. If you rolled the required number for the chosen development on any die, you’ve made the technological breakthrough. (For example, if you want the Super submarines development, you need to roll a 3.) If you fail to roll the number you need, your research has failed, and you must wait until your next turn to try again.

Step 4: Mark Developments
If your research was successful, place your control marker in the column on the Weapons Development Chart under the appropriate development. Your development becomes effective during Phase 6: Mobilize New Units of your turn.

Weapons Development
1. Jet Fighters
Your fighters are now jet fighters. Their defense increases to 5, and they cannot be hit by antiaircraft gun fire.

2. Rockets
Your antiaircraft guns are now rocket launchers. In addition to their normal combat function, they can reduce enemy industrial production. See Special Combats in Phase 4: Conduct Combat for more information.

3. Super Submarines
Your submarines are now super submarines. Their attack increases to 3, and they may not be hit by enemy aircraft now unless an enemy destroyer is present.

4. Long-Range Aircraft
Your fighters are now long-range fighters, and your bombers are now long-range bombers. Your fighters’ range increases to 6. Your bombers’ range increases to 8.

5. Combined Bombardment
Like battleships, your destroyers now can conduct bombardment during an amphibious assault. (Their attack is 3.)

6. Heavy Bombers
Your bombers are now heavy bombers. You roll two dice each on attack or defense or on a strategic bombing raid (see Special Combats in Phase 4: Conduct Combat) and use the better result of the two dice."

PHASE 2:
PURCHASE UNITS
In this phase, you may spend IPCs for additional units to be used in future turns. All the units on your power’s Reference Chart are available for purchase. A unit’s price in IPCs is listed in the Cost column next to the unit’s name.

Purchase Units Sequence
1. Order units
2. Pay for units
3. Place units in mobilization zone

Step 1: Order Units
Select all the units you wish to buy. You may buy as many as you can afford of any units, regardless of which units you started the game with.

Step 2. Pay for Units
Give IPCs to the bank equal to the total cost of the units. You do not have to spend all of your IPCs.

Step 3: Place units in Mobilization Zone
Place the purchased unit in the mobilization zone on the game board (located in the South Atlantic Ocean). You cannot use these units right away, but you will deploy them later in the turn.

PHASE 3:
COMBAT MOVE
In this phase, you may move as many of your units into as many hostile territories and sea zones as you wish. To do this, move your attacking units into the desired spaces on the game board; these may be occupied (contain enemy combat units) or enemy-controlled but unoccupied. You must make a combat move to enter an unoccupied hostile space. Attacking units can come from different spaces to attack a single hostile space, as long as each can reach it with a legal move.

A unit may move a number of spaces up to its movement allowance (or “move”). Most units must stop when they enter a hostile space. Thus, a unit with a move of 2 could move into a friendly space and then a hostile space, or just into a hostile space.

You can move units into friendly spaces en route to hostile spaces during this phase, but units other than blitzing tanks can't end their move in friendly spaces in the combat move phase. Remember that units can never move into or through neutral territories. At no time may an Allies power attack another Allies power, or an Axis power attack another Axis power. Units from the same side can freely share territories, sea zones, and space on aircraft carriers and transports with one another, though.

At the beginning of the combat move phase you may already have sea units in spaces containing enemy units that were there at the start of your turn. This situation will require you to do one of the following: remain in the sea zone and conduct combat; leave the sea zone, load units if desired, and conduct combat elsewhere; leave the sea zone to load units and return to the same sea zone to conduct combat; or, simply leave the sea zone and conduct no combat other than sailing out of harm's way. You may not load units while in the original contested sea zone. Once these sea units have moved and/or participated in combat they may not move or participate in the noncombat move phase of the turn.

Generally, each attacking unit can be involved in only one combat per turn. (There are some exceptions to this rule, such as an air unit being fired on by multiple antiaircraft guns at different points during its move.) All combat movement is considered to take place at the same time: Thus, you cannot move a unit, then conduct combat, then move that unit again during this phase. For the same reason, you cannot conduct an amphibious assault with the same transport into two different enemy territories. You cannot move additional units into an embattled space once an attack has begun.

Location: P. 12, diagram 2
Change: Panel 2 should not have a Ghostbusters symbol.
Reason: Planes can fly over hostile territory.

Special Combat Moves
A number of combat units can make special moves (and even some attacks) during this phase. These are described in detail below. (For complete information on each combat unit’s capabilities, see Appendix 1: Unit Profiles.)

Air Units
Air units (fighters and bombers) can fly over hostile spaces as if they were friendly, but they are subject to the following special rules.

Antiaircraft Guns:
Antiaircraft guns can never move in this phase; they can make noncombat moves only. However, they can make a special defense. In the combat move phase, whenever an air unit moves over or into a hostile territory containing an antiaircraft gun, the antiaircraft gun gets a chance to shoot it down during the conduct combat phase.

The air unit’s controller plots its path using the numbered punch out markers to indicate each space in which combat may occur (the first space is 1, the second 2, and so on). Whenever an air unit encounters enemy antiaircraft guns, resolve combat separately in each space along its path, starting with the first antiaircraft gun encountered.

Every time air units fly over an antiaircraft gun in a territory, the antiaircraft gun gets to shoot once at each air unit that enters. (Only one antiaircraft gun per territory can fire, however.) If the gun misses, the air unit may continue its planned attack.

Resolve all combats involving a given air unit or group of air units before moving onto the next.

Aircraft Carriers
Aircraft carriers can move during this phase. Any fighters belonging to the aircraft carrier owner move independently of the carrier. These fighters can make a combat move from the carrier's sea zone, or they can remain in the sea zone until the noncombat move phase. Guest fighters belonging to a friendly power on board your carrier must remain on board as cargo if the carrier moves in combat. They cannot take part in combat and are destroyed if the carrier is destroyed. Whether it moves during the combat move or noncombat move phase, an aircraft carrier allows friendly fighters to land on it in the sea zone where it finishes its move.

Submarines
Submarines may move through hostile sea zones as if they were friendly, and they do not have to engage enemy sea units in those zones. However, a submarine that ends its combat move in a hostile sea zone must enter combat. In addition, if a submarine enters a sea zone containing an enemy destroyer, it must end its movement there.

Tanks and Blitzing
A tank can "blitz" by moving through an unoccupied hostile territory as the first part of a move that can end in a friendly or hostile territory. The complete move must occur during the combat move phase. It establishes control of the first territory (place one of your control markers there) before it moves to the next. Remember to adjust the national production levels as you blitz. A tank that encounters enemy units in the first territory it enters must stop there, even if the unit is an antiaircraft gun or industrial complex.

Transports
At any point during the combat move phase, a transport may load or offload land units (Exception: a transport may never load units if it is in a hostile sea zone). As soon as a transport encounters hostile sea units or offloads, its movement for that turn ends. A transport that offloads units into a hostile territory begins an amphibious assault (see Special Combats on page 19).

A transport may ONLY end its combat move still carrying land units if those units were already aboard at the beginning of the turn. Any land units loaded during the combat move phase must unload during the same combat move phase, unless the transport carrying those units is forced to retreat from a sea combat in the intended offloading sea zone. The land units aboard the transports are considered cargo until they offload. Cargo cannot take part in combat and is destroyed if the transport is destroyed.

A transport in a hostile sea zone may not offload units unless the enemy units consist only of submerged submarines (see the rules for submerging submarines in phase 4: Conduct Combat).

Phase 4: CONDUCT COMBAT
In this phase, you resolve combat in each space that contains units from opposing sides. Complete all combat moves before resolving any combat. (An exception is an amphibious assault, in which sea combat must be handled before land combat. See "Special Combats" for more information)

You resolve combat by rolling dice (also known as firing) according to a standard sequence. All combat takes place at the same time, but each affected territory or sea zone is resolved separately and completely before beginning to resolve another combat. The attacker decides the order. No new units may enter as reinforcements once combat has begun.

Attacking and defending units are considered to fire at the same time, but for ease of play you roll dice in sequence: attacker first, then defender. A few units get special “opening fire” attacks that can destroy enemy units before they can fire back.

When a unit fires, you roll a die. An attacking unit scores a hit if you roll its attack or less. A defending unit scores a hit if you roll its defense or less. For example, a defending unit with a defense of 2 scores a hit only on a roll of 1 or 2; it “defends on a 2".

When one of your units scores a hit, the opposing player decides which enemy unit it applies to. Most units are destroyed by one hit and become casualties. The opposing player may designate casualties in any order.

Combat Sequence
1. Place units on battle board
2. Conduct opening fire
3. Remove opening fire casualties
4. Attacking units fire
5. Defending units fire
6. Remove casualties
7. Press attack or retreat
8. Capture territory

Step 1: Place Units on Battle Board
The battle board has two sides, labeled “Attacker” and “Defender”. Place all attacking units and defending units from a space on their respective sides, in the numbered columns that contain their names and silhouettes. The number in a unit’s column identifies that unit’s attack or defense value.

Step 2: Conduct Opening Fire
Certain units can fire before all others. Only these specially designated units may fire in this step. There is no return fire during this step.

Antiaircraft Guns
If the defender has an antiaircraft gun present and the attacker has air units in the attack, then the antiaircraft gun fires during this step. The defender rolls one die (only one antiaircraft gun fires) for each attacking air unit. You roll all anti-fighter dice at once, then all anti-bomber dice. For each type, the air unit owner allocates hits amongst the air units that are being shot at. For every roll of 1, one attacking air unit is destroyed; its controller moves it into the casualty zone of the battle board. If there are not aircraft present, ignore this step.

You can also attack enemy production with your antiaircraft guns during this step, if you have the Rockets development. (See "Rocket Strikes" for more information).

Battleship Bombardment
In an amphibious assault, your battleships in the same sea zone as the offloading transport can conduct shore bombardment. Each battleship fires once during this step against enemy land and air units in the territory being attacked. If there are no enemy land or air units present, ignore this step and leave the battleships on the game board. (This step is used only in the land combat portion of amphibious assaults. A battleship that is involved in the sea combat portion of an amphibious assault cannot fire in this step.)

If you have the Combined Bombardment development, your destroyers can also fire during this step, following the same rules as for battleships.

Submarines
Both attacking and defending submarines fire in this step. If submarines are present on both sides, they are considered to fire simultaneously. Roll for attacking submarines before defending submarines. Submarines can fire only on sea units.

Step 3: Remove Opening Fire Casualties
Clear both casualty zones, destroying all units there. (Return them to their owners’ inventories.) Return all antiaircraft guns to the game board, as well as battleships that conducted shore bombardment. Do not remove submarines from the battle board.

Destroyers and Submarine Casualties
If a destroyer is present in a combat involving enemy submarines, the destroyer’s player skips this step. The submarines' casualties can fire back at the normal time in the combat sequence, provided they have not already fired in step 2. (The destroyers provided enough advance warning to allow return fire.)

Step 4: Attacking Units Fire
All the units on the attacker’s side fire during this step. Roll one die for each attacking unit. Units with the same attack value are all rolled for at the same time. After the attacker has rolled for all attacking units, the defender must choose one of his or her units for each hit scored and move it to the casualty zone (a battleship can absorb one extra damage hit before being moved to the casualty zone if it hasn't already done so in this combat - turn it on its side to indicate this first hit). These units are not out of the game just yet. They will be able to counterattack.

Step 5: Defending Units Fire
All the units on the defender’s side fire during this step. Roll one die for each defending unit (including casualties). Units with the same defense value are all rolled for at the same time. After the defender has rolled for all defending units, the attacker must choose one of his or her units for each hit scored and move it to the casualty zone (a battleship can absorb one extra damage hit before being moved to the casualty zone if it hasn't already done so in this combat).

Step 6: Remove Casualties
Clear both casualty zones, destroying all units there. (Return them to their owner’s inventories.)

Step 7: Press Attack or Retreat
Combat continues automatically unless one of the following conditions occurs:
a) Attacker retreats;
b) Attacker loses all units;
c) Defender loses all units; or
d) Both sides lose all units.

As long as combat continues, repeat steps 2-6. (Units previously returned to the game board cannot reenter combat.) Each such set of steps constitutes one cycle of combat.

Attacker Retreats
The attacker (never the defender) can retreat during this step. Move all attacking land and sea units in that combat to a single adjacent friendly space from which at least one of the attacking units (excluding air units) entered. All such units must retreat together to the same territory, regardless of where they came from. The attacker may retreat only if enemy units remain on the battle board.

Air Units:
Air units can retreat to any friendly territory within movement range. A fighter can retreat to a friendly aircraft carrier or to a friendly sea zone, as long as a carrier moves there this turn. When you designate that an air unit will retreat, return it to the game board. It will retreat when all other air units finish their moves in the noncombat move phase.

Amphibious Assaults:
No land unit can retreat from the land combat portion of an amphibious assault. Attacking air units, however, may retreat in step 7 of the attack sequence. If they do so, they must retreat all at the same time. Remove them from the battle board and place them in the embattled territory on the game board. They will complete their move when all other air units finish their movement in the noncombat move phase. All land units must continue combat until at least one side loses all its units.

Submarines: Submarines on both sides may retreat during this step by submerging. Return the submarine to the game board and tip it onto its side to mark it as submerged. It remains submerged until the end of the noncombat move phase. (Submerged submarines do not stop enemy sea units from moving through their sea zone.)

Attacker or Defender Loses All Units
Once all units on one or both sides have been destroyed, the combat ends. If a player has units remaining, that player wins the combat. If the defender has units remaining, that player wins the combat. If the defender has units remaining, return those units to the appropriate space on the game board.

Step 8:
Capture Territory
If you win a combat as the attacker in a territory and you have one or more surviving land units there, you take control of it. If all unit on both sides were destroyed, there is no winner and the territory doesn't change hands. Sea units cannot take control of a territory; they must stay at sea.

Air units can never capture a territory. If your attack force has only air units remaining, you can’t occupy the territory you attacked, even if there are no enemy units remaining. Air units must return to a friendly territory (fighters may also land on a friendly carrier). They do so during the noncombat move phase. Until then they stay at the space where they fought.

Remove surviving land units from the battle board and place them in the newly conquered territory, place your control marker on the territory, and adjust the control markers on the National Production Chart. Your national production increases by the value of the captured territory; the loser’s decreases by the same amount.

Any antiaircraft gun or industrial complex in the captured territory remains there but now belongs to your alliance (see below for details). If you capture an antiaircraft gun, you cannot move it in the noncombat move phase of the same turn. (If you capture an industrial complex, you cannot mobilize new units there until your next turn.)

Completing Air Units’ Move

An air unit may end its move ("land") in a territory that was friendly at the start of your turn. Air units cannot land in a hostile territory or in a territory you just captured. Fighters (not bombers) can also land on a friendly aircraft carrier, provided that there is a free spot on the carrier. Fighters which do not have a valid landing space at the end of the noncombat move phase are destroyed.

You must have a carrier move (or remain in place) to pick up a fighter that would end its noncombat move in a sea zone. You cannot deliberately move any air unit out of range of a potential safe landing space (a kamikaze attack).

Liberating a Territory

If you capture a territory that was originally controlled by another member of your side, you "liberate" the territory. You do not take control of it; instead, the original controller regains the territory and its income. Antiaircraft guns or industrial complexes in that territory revert to the original controller of the territory.

If the original controller’s capital is in enemy hands at the end of the turn in which you would otherwise have liberated the territory, you capture the territory, collect income from the newly captured territory and can use any industrial complex there until the original controller’s capital is liberated. You also take ownership of any antiaircraft gun in that territory.

Capturing and Liberating Capitals
If you capture a territory containing an enemy capital (Washington, Moscow, London, Berlin, or Tokyo), follow the same procedure as for capturing a territory. Add the captured territory’s income value to your national production. In addition, you collect all unspent IPCs from the former owner of the captured capital. For example, if Germany conquers Moscow while the Soviet Union’s player is holding 18 IPCs, these are immediately transferred to Germany’s player.

The former owner of the captured capital is still in the game but cannot collect income from any territories he or she still controls and cannot buy new units nor research technologies until the capital is liberated. That player skips all but the combat move, conduct combat, and noncombat move phases. If that power or one on its side liberates the capital, the owning player can once again collect income from territories he or she controls, including territories reverting control to him or her. Even so, the player cannot yet purchase new units. It’s a long road back from losing a capital.

If a capital is liberated, any antiaircraft guns or industrial complex in that capital revert ownership to the original owner of the capital. Territories and industrial complexes controlled by the newly liberated capital's owner but in the hands of friendly powers also revert ownership. Antiaircraft guns outside the newly liberated capital remain under their pre-liberation ownership."

Capturing a Victory City
When you capture a territory containing an enemy victory city, replace that power’s control marker on the Victory Cities Chart with one of yours. If at the end of the round your side controls enough victory cities to achieve the victory condition you decided upon at the start of the game, your side wins.

Example of Combat
Germany attacks the United Kingdom in India, which contains the victory city of Calcutta.

Step1: Place Units on Battle Board. Germany is the attacker. Its infantry, tank, and fighter are placed in the appropriate columns on the attacker’s side of the battle board (1,3, and 3, respectively). The United Kingdom’s tank, infantry, and antiaircraft gun are placed in the appropriate columns on the defender’s side (3,2, and 1, respectively).

Step 2: Conduct Opening fire. The U.K. antiaircraft gun fires on the German fighter. The U.K.’s player rolls a 1 – a hit! Germany’s player moves the fighter to the attacker’s casualty zone, and the U.K.’s player returns the antiaircraft gun to the game board.

Step 3: Remove Opening Fire Casualties. The German fighter is destroyed and removed from the battle board.

Step 4: Attacking Units Fire.
Germany’s player rolls one die for the infantry and gets a 4, a miss. But rolling one die for the tank produces a 2, which is a hit. The U.K.’s player chooses the infantry as a casualty and moves it to the defender’s casualty zone.

Step 5: Defending Units Fire. The U.K.’s player rolls one die for the tank, which has a defense of 3, and one for the infantry, with a defense of 2 (even though it is in the casualty zone). The U.K.’s player rolls a 4 and a 5, both misses.

Step 6: Remove Casualties.
The U.K. infantry is destroyed.

Step 7. Press Attack or Retreat.
Germany’s player doesn’t want to retreat, so a new cycle of combat starts again at step 2. There is no activity in steps 2 and 3, however, since there are no units left capable of opening fire.

(Second) Step 4: Attacking Units Fire. Germany’s player rolls one die for the infantry and rolls a 1, a hit. The U.K.’s last remaining piece, the tank, must become a casualty. Germany’s player does not roll for the tank because the defender has no units left.

(Second) Step 5: Defending Units Fire. The U.K.’s player rolls for the tank (now a casualty) and scores a 2, a hit. Germany’s player chooses its infantry as the casualty.

(Second) Step 6: Remove Casualties. The U.K. tank and the German infantry are destroyed.

(Second) Step 7: Press Attack or Retreat. The U.K. has lost all units, so Germany wins, and the combat is over.

Step 8: Capture Territory.
Germany has captured India, a territory with an income value of 3. Germany’s player positions the surviving tank next to the captured antiaircraft gun in the territory and places a German control marker there. Germany’s marker on the National Production Chart moves up by 3; the United Kingdom’s marker moves down by 3. Germany has also captured the victory city of Calcutta. Germany’s player removes the U.K. control marker from the space by Calcutta on the Victory Cities Chart. The Axis is one step closer to victory.

Special Combats
Some special actions and situations occur during this phase. These are described in detail below.

Amphibious Assaults
In an amphibious assault, land units offload from transports and attack an enemy coastal territory (one that borders a sea zone) or island group. The attacker must declare the target of an amphibious assault during the combat move phase.

If the enemy has no ships in the sea zone(s) from which the attack comes, then there is only an offloading and the amphibious assault begins immediately. The amphibious assault is handled like any other land combat, except that attacking land units cannot retreat (not even if they came from adjacent territories or moved there over land in support of those units offloading from transports).

An amphibious assault from at least one hostile sea zone is a two stage combat which begins with sea combat in the hostile sea zone(s) followed by the amphibious assault.

Sea Combat: This is handled like any other sea combat (only sea and air units participate). All your sea units (including your transports) attack all enemy sea units and fighters in that sea zone. If a sea combat occurs, your battleships fire at the same time as your other attacking units in the sea combat. They cannot support the assaulting land units.

Once all defending sea and air units have been removed from the battle board in the sea combat (i.e. sunk or submerged), then the amphibious assault begins. If any land units originally designated for the amphibious assault survive the sea combat they must now offload into the amphibious assault.

If no land units survived the sea combat, or if the attacking sea units retreated from the sea combat, then any other units that were designated to participate in the land attack (including air units), must still conduct one round of land combat in a regular attack on the intended hostile territory before they may retreat.

From sea zones where no sea combat occurred and land units offloaded to the amphibious assault, battleships in the same seazone as at least one offloading transport can support the amphibious assault force with shore bombardment (see Step 1: Conduct Opening Fire above). Each battleship fires once during the opening fire step of the first round of combat against enemy units in the territory being attacked.

Air Units: A given air unit may participate in the sea combat or the amphibious assault; it may not do both. The attacking player must declare which air units are involved in each of the amphibious assault and sea combats and cannot change their assignments later. Attacking air units, whether involved in the sea combat or amphibious assault, may retreat according to the normal rules. Defending fighters on aircraft carriers can defend only in the sea combat. Defending air units in a territory can defend only in the amphibious assault (or in the regular land battle if the amphibious assault does not occur).

Artillery Supporting Infantry
When an infantry attacks along with an artillery, the infantry’s attack increases to 2. Each infantry must be matched one-for-one with a supporting artillery: If your infantry outnumber your artillery, the excess still have an attack of 1.

Battleship Damage
Unlike other combat units, a battleship requires 2 hits to destroy. If a battleship is hit, turn it on its side to mark its damaged status but do not move it to the casualty zone unless it takes a second hit in the same combat. If a battleship survives a combat having taken 1 hit, return it upright to the game board. Its damage is “repaired”, and it is unharmed at the start of the next combat.

Multinational Forces
Units on the same side can share a territory or sea zone, constituting a multinational force. Such forces can defend together, but they cannot attack together.

Multinational defense: When a space containing a multinational force is attacked, all its units defend together. The attacker fires first as usual. If a hit is scored, the defenders mutually determine the casualty; if they cannot agree, the attacker chooses. Each defender rolls separately for his or her units.

Multinational Attack: A multinational force cannot attack the same space together. Each attacking power moves and fires its own units on its own turn. A fighter may launch from an aircraft carrier owned by a friendly power, but the carrier may not move until its controller’s turn. Similarly, a carrier can carry a friendly fighter as cargo, but the fighter cannot participate in an attack involving that carrier. A land unit can assault a coastal territory from a friendly transport, but it is offloaded on it owner’s turn.

Transporting Multinational Forces: Transports belong to a friendly power can load and offload your land units. This is a three-step process.
1. You load your land units aboard the friendly transport on your turn.
2. The transport’s controller moves it (or not) on that player’s turn.
3. You offload your land units on your next turn.

Rocket Strikes
If you have the Rockets development, your antiaircraft guns can act as rocket launchers. You can conduct an economic attack against an enemy industrial complex to “destroy” IPCs. During the combat move phase, declare which antiaircraft guns are making rocket strikes. There is no defense against this attack. From each territory, one antiaircraft gun may attack an industrial complex within 3 spaces, though each industrial complex may be attacked by only one rocket launcher in a turn. Roll one die for the rocket. The result of that roll is the number of IPCs destroyed by that rocket. The maximum combined damage inflicted in one turn by all strategic bombing raids on one industrial complex and any rocket attack on the same industrial complex is the territory's income value. The opponent must surrender that many IPCs to the bank (or as many as the player has, whichever is the lesser amount).

Strategic Bombing Raids
A strategic bombing raid is an economic attack against an enemy industrial complex to “destroy” IPCs. Only bombers may conduct strategic bombing raids.

Resolve a strategic bombing raid in the same way as a regular combat. However, it involves only attacking bombers and defending antiaircraft guns, although you may also conduct another (conventional) attack on the same territory this turn. You cannot use the same bombers in a strategic bombing raid and another attack on the same territory in one turn.

During the opening fire step, an enemy antiaircraft gun fires on each attacking bomber. Any bombers that survive may attack the industrial complex. Roll one die for each bomber. The result of that roll is the amount of IPCs destroyed by that bomber. The maximum combined damage inflicted in one turn by all strategic bombing raids on one industrial complex and any rocket attack on the same industrial complex is the territory's income value. The opponent must surrender that many IPCs to the bank (or as many as the player has, whichever is the lesser amount).

The strategic bombing raid now ends. Remove all bombers involved in the attack from the battle board: they cannot participate in any other combats in that territory. The bombers return to a friendly territory.

PHASE 5:
NONCOMBAT MOVE
In this phase, you can move any of your units that did not move in the combat move phase or participate in combat during your turn. This is a good time to gather your units, either to strengthen vulnerable territories or to reinforce units at the front. Only aircraft and submarines may move through hostile spaces during this phase.

Where Units Can Move
Land Units: Land units can move into any friendly territories. They can never move into hostile territories (not even those that contain no combat units but are enemy-controlled).

Air Units: Air units can land in any friendly territories. They cannot end their move in hostile territories or in any territories you captured this turn. Fighters can land on any friendly carrier, even those that move during this phase (but not in the middle of the carrier’s move; see below). An air unit that flies over an antiaircraft gun in this phase is not fired upon. Antiaircraft guns only fire in the conduct combat phase against air units that moved in the combat move phase.

Sea Units: Sea units can move through any friendly sea zone. They cannot move through hostile sea zones, except when the enemy forces consist of only submerged submarines. Transports can move to friendly coastal territories and load or offload cargo, unless they moved during the combat move phase.

Aircraft carriers can move to sea zones to allow friendly fighters to land. (They must move there if they have not moved in combat and the friendly seazone is the only valid landing zone for the fighters). An aircraft carrier must end its move once a fighter has landed on it.

Submarines cannot end their noncombat move in hostile sea zones. At the end of this phase, all submerged submarines resurface. This does not trigger combat, even if there are enemy units in that sea zone - this turn's conduct combat phase is over. However, a player who begins a combat move phase with units in a sea zone containing enemy submarines may choose to not move and instead attack the submarines.

PHASE 6:
MOBILIZE NEW UNITS
During this phase, you deploy all the units you purchased during the purchase units phase. Move the newly purchased units from the mobilization zone on the game board to territories containing industrial complexes you have controlled since the start of your turn. (You can’t yet use industrial complexes that you captured this turn.)

Restrictions on Placement
You can mobilize only a number of units up to the income value of the territory containing the industrial complex. Excess units are lost. You cannot place your new units at an industrial complex owned by a friendly power, unless its capital is in enemy control and you have taken control of the industrial complex from an enemy power after the friendly power's capital was captured.
Place land units and bombers only in territories containing eligible industrial complexes. They do not enter play on transports or aircraft carriers. However, fighters can enter play on newly built aircraft carriers.

Place sea units only in sea zones adjacent to territories containing eligible industrial complexes. New sea units can enter play even in a hostile sea zone. No combat occurs because the conduct combat phase is over. Newly built fighters can be placed into territories containing an industrial complex controlled by your power from the start of your turn, or they may be placed on an aircraft carrier owned by your power in a seazone adjacent to a territory with such an industrial complex. The aircraft carrier may be an existing one or it may be a newly built carrier. You may not place a new fighter on a carrier owned by a friendly power. Place new industrial complexes in any territory that you have controlled since the start of your turn and that has an income value of at least 1. You can never have more than one industrial complex per territory.

PHASE 7:
COLLECT INCOME
In this phase, you earn production income to finance future attacks and strategies. Look up your power’s national production level (indicated by your control marker) on the National Production Chart, and collect that number of IPCs from the bank. Double-check your income by counting up the value of all the territories you control.

If your capital is under an enemy power’s control, you cannot collect income. A power cannot lend or give IPCs to another power, even if both powers are on the same side.

Ending Your Turn
Once you have completed the collect income phase of your turn, the next player now takes his or her turn. Once all powers’ turns are complete, check for victory.

At the end of each U.S. turn, check to see if either side has achieved the victory conditions set at the start of the game: minor victory (control 8 victory cities), moderate victory (control 9 victory cities), major victory (control 10 victory cities), or total victory (control 12 victory cities). If your side controls enough victory cities to achieve the predetermined victory condition, you all win the war.

Otherwise, start a new turn and continue the conflict.

Individual Winner
Although Axis & Allies is a team game, it’s also possible to declare an individual winner. (This is optional, as many players value the team aspect of the game more than individual glory.) Subtract the beginning national production level for each member of the winning side (as marked on the National Production Chart) from its final national production level. The player of the power that has increased its national production level the most is the individual winner.


APPENDIX I: UNIT PROFILES

This section provides detailed information for each unit in the game. Each entry has a short description, including national identification, then lists the unit’s cost in IPCs, its attack and defense values, and the number of territories or sea zones it can move. Each unit type also has special abilities, which are summarized below these statistics.

LAND UNITS
Infantry, artillery, tanks, and antiaircraft guns can attack and defend only in territories. Only infantry, artillery, and tanks can capture hostile territories. All but industrial complexes can be carried by transports. Industrial complexes are located in territories but cannot move, attack, defend, or be transported.

Infantry
Description: Soldiers who make up the backbone of any ground force.
Cost: 3
Attack: 1 (2 when supported by artillery)
Defense: 2
Move: 1
Special Abilities
Supported by Artillery: when an infantry attacks along with an artillery, the infantry’s attack increases to 2. Each infantry must be matched one-for-one with a supporting artillery unit: If your infantry outnumber your artillery, the excess infantry units still have an attack of 1. For example, if you attack with two artillery and five infantry, two of your infantry have an attack of 2 and the rest, 1. Infantry are not supported by artillery on defense.

Artillery
Description: Heavy gun batteries that can support infantry attacks.
Cost: 4
Attack: 2
Defense: 2
Move: 1
Special Abilities
Support Infantry: When an infantry attacks along with an artillery, the infantry’s attack increases to 2. Each infantry must be marched one-for-one with a supporting artillery unit. Artillery does not support infantry on defense.

Tanks
Description: Armored units that pack a major punch.
Cost: 5
Attack: 3
Defense: 3
Move: 2
Special Abilities
Blitz: Tanks can "Blitz" by moving through an unoccupied hostile territory as the first part of a 2 space move that can end in a friendly or hostile territory. This complete move must occur during the combat move phase. By blitzing, the tank establishes control of the first territory before it moves to the next. The second territory can be friendly or hostile, or even the space the tank came from. A tank that encounters enemy units in the first territory it enters must stop there, even if the unit is an antiaircraft gun or industrial complex.

Antiaircraft Guns
Description: gun batteries that shoot down invading air units.
Cost: 5
Attack: -- (1 die IPC loss with Rockets)
Defense: 1 (opening fire only)
Move: 1 (Noncombat only)
Special Abilities
Cannot Attack: An antiaircraft gun can never move during the combat move phase (other than being carried on a transport if the antiaircraft gun was loaded on a prior turn). It cannot attack, other than to launch a rocket strike (see "Rocket Strikes").

Shoot down Air Units: Antiaircraft guns can shoot down attacking air units. Whenever an air unit enters a territory containing an enemy antiaircraft gun, the antiaircraft gun fires during the opening fire step of combat. Roll one die for each attacking air unit (but only one antiaircraft gun in a territory can fire, even if they are controlled by different powers). For every roll of 1, one attacking air unit is destroyed.

Usable by Invading Forces: If a territory is captured, any antiaircraft guns there are also captured. Their new owner is the player owning the territory at the end of this turn. They can be used by their new owner in future combats. Antiaircraft guns are never destroyed, except when a transport carrying one is sunk. If you move an antiaircraft gun into a friendly territory, place one of your control markers under it.

Weapons Development – Rockets: If you have the Rockets development, your antiaircraft guns can act as rocket launchers. You can attack enemy production with your rockets during the opening fire step of combat. This is the only situation in which antiaircraft guns can attack. From each territory, one rocket may launch an attack. It attacks an industrial complex within 3 spaces. Any industrial complex may be attacked by only one rocket launcher in a turn. The maximum combined damage inflicted in one turn by all strategic bombing raids on one industrial complex and any rocket attack on the same industrial complex is the territory's income value. The opponent must surrender that many IPCs to the bank.

Industrial Complexes
Description: Factories that produce new units.
Cost: 15
Attack: -
Defense: -
Move: -
Special Abilities
Cannot Attack, defend, or Move: An industrial complex can never attack, defend, or move. It cannot be transported. It is never placed on the battle board. When struck by rockets or a strategic bombing raid, the industrial complex is not destroyed; instead, its controller surrenders IPCs.

Mobilization sites: You may mobilize units only in territories containing industrial complexes you have controlled since the start of your turn. You can mobilize only a number of units up to the income value of the territory containing the industrial complex (for example, an industrial complex built in Eastern Canada may mobilize up to three units per turn). You can place new industrial complexes in any territory that you have controlled since the start of your turn and that has an income value of a least 1. There can never be more than one industrial complex per territory.

Usable by Invading Forces: If a territory is captured, an industrial complex there is also captured. The capturing player can use it on the turn after it is captured. Industrial complexes are never destroyed. You cannot place your new units at an industrial complex owned by a friendly power, unless its capital is in enemy hands. Even if you liberate a territory with an industrial complex in it, you cannot use the complex; the original controller can use it on his or her next turn.

AIR UNITS
Fighters and bombers can attack and defend in both territories and sea zones. They can land only in friendly territories or (in the case of fighters) on friendly aircraft carriers. Your air units cannot land in territories you just captured, whether they were involved in the combat or not. Air units can move through hostile territories and sea zones as if they were friendly. However, they are exposed to antiaircraft fire whenever they enter a hostile territory that contains an antiaircraft gun.

To determine range, count each space your air unit enters “after takeoff.” When moving over water from a coastal territory or an island group, count the first sea zone entered as 1 space. When flying to an island group, count the surrounding sea zone and the island group itself as 1 space each. (An island is considered a territory within a sea zone; air units based on an island cannot defend the surrounding sea zone.) When moving a fighter from a carrier, do not count the carrier’s sea zone as the first space - your fighter is in that sea zone. To participate in combat, a fighter must take off from its carrier before the carrier moves, otherwise it is cargo.

You cannot send air units on “suicide runs,” deliberately moving them into combat with no place to land afterward. If there is any question about whether an attack is a "suicide run", then in the combat move phase, you must declare, prior to rolling any battles, some possible way (however remote the possibility is) for all your attacking air units to land safely that turn. This could include a combination of combat moves. It could also include noncombat moves by a carrier. If it does include non-combat moves by a carrier, then the carrier may not move in the combat move phase.

In order to demonstrate that an air unit MAY have a safe landing zone, you may assume that all of your attacking rolls will be hits, and all defending rolls will be misses. You may NOT, however, use a planned retreat of any carrier to demonstrate a possible safe landing zone for any fighter.

If you declared that a carrier will move during the noncombat move phase to provide a safe landing zone for a fighter moved in the combat move phase, you must follow through and move the carrier to its planned location in the noncombat move phase unless the fighter has landed safely elsewhere or has been destroyed before then.

Fighters
Description: Small, fast aircraft that threaten everything on land or sea.
Cost: 10
Attack: 3
Defense: 4 (5 with Jet Fighters)
Move: 4 (6 with Long-Range Aircraft)
Special Abilities
Land on Aircraft Carriers: Fighters may be carried by aircraft carriers. Up to two fighters may be on a friendly aircraft carrier at a time. A fighter must be launched from the carrier’s initial position to participate in combat this turn. However, it may land on a carrier in the noncombat move phase(even if retreating) or during any other noncombat move. (A fighter may not land on a carrier during the carrier’s movement). Your aircraft carrier can move to a sea zone where one of your fighters has ended its move (and in fact, it must do so if it is able) but cannot move any farther that turn.

A fighter based on a defending carrier that is destroyed in combat must try to land. It must move 1 space to a friendly territory or aircraft carrier, or be destroyed. However, your fighter based on your attacking carrier launches before combat (even if it is not participating in combat), and if it survives, can retreat to a friendly territory or carrier within range. If any fighter has no place to land by the end of the noncombat move phase, it is destroyed.

Weapons development – Jet Fighters: If you have the Jet Fighters development, all your fighters defend on a 5 instead of a 4, and they cannot be fired at by antiaircraft guns.

Weapons Development – Long-Range Aircraft: If you have the Long-range Aircraft development, all your fighters can move 6 spaces instead of 4.

Bombers
Description: Mammoth, long-range aircraft that drop bombs on their targets.
Cost: 15
Attack: 4 (roll twice with Heavy Bombers)
Defense: 1 (roll twice with Heavy Bombers)
Move: 6 (8 with Long-Range Aircraft)
Special Abilities
Strategic Bombing Raids: a bomber can make an economic attack against an enemy industrial complex. During the opening fire step of combat, bombers that survive any antiaircraft fire may attack the industrial complex. Roll one die for each surviving bomber. The opponent must surrender that many IPCs to the bank. The maximum combined damage inflicted in one turn by all strategic bombing raids on one industrial complex and any rocket attack on the same industrial complex is the territory's income value.

Weapon Development – Heavy Bombers: If you have the heavy bombers development, roll two dice for each bomber, then select the best of the two dice. A heavy bomber hits on attack if either die is a 4 or less and it hits on defense if either die is a 1. The higher of the two dice is the IPC loss inflicted in a strategic bombing raid. The maximum combined damage inflicted in one turn by all strategic bombing raids on one industrial complex and any rocket attack on the same industrial complex is the territory's income value.

Weapon Development – Long-Range Aircraft: If you have the Long-Range Aircraft development, all your bombers can move 8 spaces instead of 6.

SEA UNITS
Battleships, destroyers, aircraft carriers, transports and submarines attack and defend in sea zones. They can never move into territories.

All sea units can move up to 2 friendly sea zones. They cannot move through hostile sea zones, except when the enemy forces consist of only submerged submarines (see Submarines, below). If enemy units other than submerged submarines occupy a sea zone, your sea units end their movement and enter combat. Submarines are an exception: They can pass through a hostile sea zone without stopping, unless there is a destroyer present (see Destroyers, below).

Some sea units can carry other units. Transports can carry only land units. Aircraft carriers can carry only fighters.

Battleships
Description: Powerful and nearly indestructible monarchs of the sea.
Cost: 24
Attack: 4
Defense: 4
Move: 2
Special Abilities
Two Hits to Destroy: A battleship requires 2 hits to destroy. If a battleship is hit, turn it on its side to mark its damaged status but do not move it to the casualty zone of the battle board unless it takes a second hit in the same combat. If a battleship survives a combat having taken 1 hit, return it upright to the game board.

Shore Bombardment: In an amphibious assault, your battleships in the same sea zone as the offloading transport can conduct shore bombardment. Each battleship fires once during the opening fire step against enemy land units in the territory being attacked. (Any enemy units hit by the shore bombardment do not fire back, but are immediately lost.) A battleship cannot conduct shore bombardment if it was involved in a sea combat prior to the amphibious assault.

Destroyers
Description: Small, fast warships that hunt submarines.
Costs: 12
Attack: 3
Defense: 3
Move: 2
Special Abilities
Submarine Disruption: A destroyer cancels the special abilities of submarines (see Submarines, below). Enemy submarines cannot move freely through a sea zone containing your destroyer. If you have a destroyer in a combat, the casualties of enemy submarines can return fire. Also, enemy submarines cannot submerge while your destroyer is present.

Weapons Development – Combined Bombardment: If you have the Combined Bombardment development, in an amphibious assault your destroyers in the same sea zone as the offloading transport can conduct shore bombardment, just like battleships. Each destroyer fires once during the opening fire step (using its attack of 3) against enemy land units in the territory being attacked. (Any enemy units hit by the shore bombardment do not fire back, but are immediately lost). A destroyer cannot conduct shore bombardment if it was involved in a sea combat prior to the amphibious assault.
Last edited by Larry on Tue Jun 08, 2004 8:43 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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Larry Harris' Tournament Rules ((Part 2))

Post by Larry » Wed May 19, 2004 11:51 pm

Aircraft Carriers
Description: Giant seaborne platforms from which fighters can take off and land.
Cost: 16
Attack: 1
Defense: 3
Move: 2
Special Abilities
Carry Fighters: An aircraft carrier can carry up to two fighters, including those belonging to friendly powers. Fighters from friendly powers can take off and land from your carriers, but only during the power’s turn. Any fighters belonging to the aircraft carrier owner move independently of the carrier. These fighters can make a combat move from the carrier's original sea zone, or they can remain in the original sea zone until the noncombat move phase. Fighters belonging to friendly powers on attacking carriers are always treated as cargo, as it is not their turn. Your aircraft carrier can move to or remain in a sea zone where one of your fighters will end its noncombat move (and in fact, it must do so if it is able).

Fighter Defense: Whenever a carrier is attacked, its fighters (even those belonging to friendly powers) are considered to be defending in the air and can be chosen as casualties rather than the carrier. (However, a fighter can’t be chosen as a casualty from a submarine hit, because submarines can attack only sea units).

Transports
Description: Vessels that carry land units to combat.
Cost: 8
Attack: 0
Defense: 1
Move: 2
Special Abilities
No Attack Fire: A transport has an attack value of 0, so it can never fire in the attacking units fire step. However, it may be part of an attacking force. If it is the only attacking unit left, it must survive the defender fires step before it can retreat. If a transport is destroyed, its cargo is destroyed as well.

Carry Land Units: A transport may carry land units belonging to you or to friendly powers. Its capacity is any one land unit, plus one additional infantry. Thus, a full transport may carry a tank and an infantry, an artillery and an infantry, an antiaircraft gun and an infantry, or two infantry. A transport can never carry an industrial complex. Land units on a transport are cargo; they cannot attack or defend while at sea. They are destroyed if their transport is destroyed.

Land units belonging to friendly powers must load on their controller’s turn, be carried on your turn, and offload on a later turn of their controller.

Loading onto and/or offloading from a transport counts as a land unit’s entire move; it cannot move before loading or after offloading. Place the land units alongside the transport in the sea zone. If the transport moves in the noncombat move phase, any number of units aboard may offload into only one friendly territory.

Loading and Offloading: A transport can load cargo before, during, and after it moves. A transport can pick up cargo, move 1 sea zone, pick up more cargo, move 1 more sea zone, and offload the cargo at the end of its movement. It may also remain at sea with the cargo still aboard (but only if the cargo remaining aboard was loaded in a previous turn or was loaded this turn in the noncombat move phase). A transport can offload into a hostile territory only during an amphibious assault (see below).

Whenever a transport offloads, it cannot move again that turn. If a transport retreats, it cannot offload that turn. A transport can never offload in two territories during a single turn, nor can it offload cargo onto another transport. If a sea zone contains hostile units, the transport may not load or offload in that sea zone (unless the only hostile units are submerged submarines).

Bridging: A transport can load and offload units without moving from the sea zone it is in. This is referred to as “bridging.” Each such transport is still limited to its cargo capacity. It can offload in only one territory, and once it offloads, it cannot move, load or offload again that turn. A transport cannot bridge in a sea zone that contains hostile units. Bridging counts as the transport's move for the turn.

Amphibious Assaults: A transport may begin or take part in an amphibious assault by offloading at least one of its cargo units into a hostile territory during the combat move phase. If it does so, it must offload all units that have been loaded during this combat move phase, and it may offload any number of units owned by the transport's power that already were on board at turn start.If enemy sea units are present in the sea zone in which the transport is to offload, a sea combat must be fought first. If the transport survives that combat, then after all defending sea units are destroyed (or submerged), it may offload into the hostile territory.

Submarines
Description: Predators that attack from beneath the surface.
Cost: 8
Attack: 2 (Opening fire step) (3 with super submarines) Defense: 2 (Opening fire step)
Move: 2
Special Abilities
Treat Hostile Sea Zones as Friendly: A submarine can move through a sea zone that contains enemy units. However, if it ends its combat move in a hostile sea zone, combat will occur. A submarine cannot end a noncombat move in a hostile sea zone. If a submarine enters a sea zone containing an enemy destroyer, it must end its movement there.

Sneak Attack: Submarines always fire in the opening fire step, whether on attack or defense. They can fire only on sea units. Casualties from this attack will be destroyed before they can return fire, unless an enemy destroyer is present. (Any sea or air unit can hit a submarine.)

Submerge: A submarine may submerge in combat after the attacker and defender have fired, regardless of what other units do. It is returned to the game board and remains submerged until the end of the noncombat move phase. The submarine then resurfaces regardless of whether enemy units are still there; this does not trigger combat. Enemy sea units may move freely through a sea zone containing a submerged submarine, and enemy transports may load or offload there.

The presence of an enemy destroyer in combat prevents a submarine from submerging.

Weapons Development - Super Submarines: If you have the super submarines development, all your submarines attack at 3, and they cannot be attacked by enemy air units unless an enemy destroyer is present in the sea zone.

APPENDIX 2: A SAMPLE TURN
Our Soviet Union player, Katarina, is taking her first turn, which is the first turn of the game. She starts with 24 IPCs and all the units listed on her Reference Chart. She is already threatened by Germany to the west. The illustrations below show only the relevant units.

Phase 1:
Develop Weapons
Katarina decides to try researching the Rockets development. She spends 5 IPCs to buy a single research die. She rolls and gets lucky – a 2! Her antiaircraft guns will now be able to fire on enemy industrial complexes beginning on Katarina's next turn.

Phase 2:
Purchase Units
Katarina has 19 IPCs left. She thinks she’ll need more tanks to deal with the German threat. So she purchases three tanks, as well as one artillery, and places them all in the mobilization zone.

Phase 3:
Combat Move
Katarina cannot wait for Germany to build up further, when it already has troops right next door to her capital of Moscow. She strikes the German forces in West Russia. Three infantry and a tank attack from Archangel, and two infantry and a fighter join them from Karelia S.S.R.

Phase 4:
Conduct Combat

{The first paragraph has been deleted. Please remove the long arrow from the second graphic.}

Katarina resolves her attack against West Russia. She puts her five infantry in column 1 on the attacker’s side of the battle board and her tank and fighters in column 3. Franz puts his artillery and infantry in column 2 and his tank in column 3 on the defender’s side.

No units in this combat can conduct opening fire, so Katarina (the attacking player) now rolls for her units.

She handles the infantry first, getting two 1s out of the five rolls for two hits. Next she rolls for the fighter and tank. She gets a 2 and a 4, for one hit. Germany has taken three casualties; Franz moves all three infantry to the defender’s casualty zone.

Franz now rolls as the defender. He rolls three dice for the infantry (even though they are all casualties) and one for the artillery, needing a 2 on each. One comes up a 1, a hit. He rolls one die for the tank but misses with a 5. Katarina moves one infantry to the attacker’s casualty zone. Then both players remove their casualties.

As the attacker, Katarina could choose to retreat now, but she senses victory and presses the attack. She rolls four dice for her infantry and gets three 1’s –overkill! Franz moves his remaining units to his casualty zone. He fires back and hits with a 2 for the artillery but misses with a 6 for the luckless tank. Katarina moves one of her infantry to her casualty zone. After both players remove their casualties, Katarina places all her surviving attackers in West Russia (except the fighter, which will land in Russia in the noncombat move phase - it is placed in West Russia for now). She now takes control of West Russia, placing one of her control markers in the territory. Her control marker moves up 2 spaces on the National Production Chart, indicating her new production of 26, and Germany’s moves down 2 spaces to 38.

Phase 5:
Noncombat Move
Archangel looks a little bare to Katarina, so she moves two infantry and one artillery into Archangel from Russia. She moves both tanks from Russia to Karelia S.S.R. Then she moves her submarine 2 spaces into sea zone 6. She moves her fighter from West Russia to Russia.

Phase 6:
Mobilize New Units
Katarina places the three tanks and one artillery that she bought earlier in the Caucasus, next to one of her industrial complexes. This is the maximum number of units she can mobilize in this territory, which has an income value of 4.

Phase 7:
Collect Income
Katarina collects 26 IPCs from the bank.

It’s now Germany’s turn, and Franz is itching for payback.

APPENDIX 3: OPTIONAL RULES
Veteran players may wish to vary the play experience. The following optional rules set out national advantages for each power in the game, simulating its historic strategies or benefits. A power may not share its national advantages with friendly powers.

A number of these advantages apply to a territory controlled by a given power at the beginning of the game and can take effect only if that territory is still controlled by that power. For example, the Soviet Union begins play controlling the red territories on the game board, so a national advantage that refers to a “red territory” can only take effect if that territory is still controlled by the Soviet Union.

If you want to use these optional rules, decide on the number of national advantages each power will get. Each player chooses that many advantages for his or her power. If you prefer, you can roll randomly that number of times for each power on the National Advantages Table below. (National Advantages Table not shown)

Soviet Union National Advantages
1. Russian Winter
Russia’s greatest ally was its winter cold. Germany’s invasion stopped dead as the snows came down.
Once during the game in your collect income phase, you can declare a severe winter. Until the start of your next turn, your infantry defend on a 3.

2. Nonaggression Treaty
The Japanese refrained from attacking the Soviet Union during most of the war. They already had one bear coming at them from the east.
The first time in the game that the Japanese forces attack any red territory, you may place four of your infantry for free in that territory before resolving combat. If Japan attacks more than one red territory in that turn, you may decide which such territory receives the infantry. If you attack an orange territory before Japan attacks you, you lose this national advantage.

3. Mobile Industry
In response to the threat from the Russian front, the Soviets moved their factories east. They produced 5,000 tanks east of the Urals in 1942.

Your industrial complexes each may move 1 territory during your noncombat move phase. It may be used in the same turn to place units (up to a maximum of the new territory's value). They cannot move during the combat move phase. If an opponent captures them, that opponent cannot move them. You may mobilize at a complex if you controlled both the industrial complex and it's new territory at the start of your turn.

4. Salvage
After the battle of Kursk in 1943, the Germans left the shells of their wrecked tanks behind. The Soviets found interesting uses for them.
If you retain control of a red territory against attacking tanks and at least one attacking tank is destroyed, you may place one free Soviet tank in that territory.

5. Lend-Lease
With the Ukraine lost and factories moving east, the Soviet Union could neither feed nor rebuild itself. The Allies came to its rescue.
During your mobilize new units phase, you can convert one U.K. and one U.S. land unit into Soviet units if they are in a red territory. Remove the affected units from play and replace them with the same units of your own color.

6. Trans-Siberian Railway
The Trans-Siberian Railway spanned 10,000 kilometers from Moscow to Vladivostok, the longest main line in the world.
In the noncombat move phase, your infantry, antiaircraft guns, and artillery may move 2 territories per turn only among these territories: Russia, Novosibirsk, Yakut S.S.R., and Buryatia S.S.R.

Germany National Advantages
1. U-Boat Interdiction
The Untersee boats swarmed Allied shipping lanes, sinking ships regardless of their cargo. Some “cargo” was noncombatants.
During the collect income phase of the U.K. and U.S. turns, subtract 1 IPC from the collecting power's income for each of your submarines on the game board.

2. Atlantic Wall
The Germans fortified the European Atlantic coast with massive defensive systems from Norway to Spain.
During any amphibious assault against a gray territory, all your infantry defend on a 3 during the first cycle of combat.

3. Panzerblitz
The colossal Panzers rumbled across Europe and North Africa. They would breach enemy lines, then turn and wreak havoc on the defenders.
If your attacking forces destroy all defending units in a territory in one cycle of combat, any of your surviving tanks in the attacking forces may move 1 territory during the noncombat move phase.

4. Wolf Packs
Wolf packs of U-boats prowled the Atlantic, working together to down Allied convoys. The only sure thing about a U-boat was that there always was another nearby.
Your submarines attack on a 3 (4 if you have the Super Submarines development) if there is more than one of them at the start of the combat cycle. When there are less than two submarines at the start of a combat cycle, this ability is lost. Wolf Packs does not improve defending submarines. Enemy destroyers do not affect this National Advantage. The submarines may come from different sea zones, but they must attack the same sea zone.

5. Luftwaffe Dive-Bomber
Europe was blitzed and bombed. The Ju-87 Stuka dive-bomber, a small plane, played a big role. Its screaming siren generated terror on all battle fronts.

Your fighters may conduct first round tactical bombing runs. They are subject to antiaircraft fire as normal. In the first cycle of combat, if there are no defending fighters present, the fighters hit on a roll of 5 or less. In succeeding cycles of combat, the fighters hit normally. If defending fighters are present, this first cycle ability is cancelled.

6. Fortress Europe
The Gustav line in Italy was ordered to hold at all costs. Those costs included tens of thousands of men on both sides.
Your artillery in gray territories defends on a 3.

United Kingdom National Advantages
1. Radar
Britain’s radar alerted it to the threat of German planes crossing the channel.
UK owned antiaircraft guns in tan territories hit air units on a roll of 1 or 2.

2. Joint Strike
The most powerful strike in the war was the joint Allied assault on Normandy. The planning required to launch this simultaneous invasion has never been equaled.
Once during the game at the start of a round (before the Russian turn), you may declare a joint strike. That round, you complete your turn as normal, except you must skip combat move, conduct combat, and noncombat move phases. On those phases of the U.S. turn, the U.S. player uses your units in his or her combat move, conduct combat, and noncombat move phases together with his own units. You and the U.S. player must agree on attacking casualties, or the opposing player gets to choose them. Antiaircraft fire is rolled separately against each nationality of air units; all anti-U.K. dice are rolled before any anti-U.S. die is rolled. Weapons developments or national advantages still only apply to the units of the power that gained the development or has the advantage. A joint strike may not be called off once it is declared.

3. Enigma Decoded
Working in a secret facility in Bletchley Park, Alan Turing’s cryptographers broke the codes of the Nazi Enigma machines. They could then send false messages back.
Once per game, when Germany finishes its combat move phase, but before its conduct combat phase, you may make one special move. You may move any number of your units from any one adjacent space into one friendly space being attacked by Germany (Germany moving sea units to an empty sea zone does not count). Alternatively, you may move any number of your units from a space being attacked by Germany into an adjacent friendly space, but you must leave at least one of your units behind. This special move otherwise follows the rules for a noncombat move. If your units survive, they remain in the space to which they were moved.

4. Mideast Oil
The United Kingdom’s 1920 division of the Middle East tapped into the power from the sands. The Germans tried to get that power for themselves.
If an air unit you own lands in Anglo-Egypt, Trans-Jordan, or Persia during your noncombat move phase, it may then move an additional number of spaces equal to its normal movement.

5. French Resistance
France fell quickly to the Germans. Thousands of French patriots who would otherwise have died in battle on the frontlines later rose up against the occupiers.
Once per game, if the Allies control Western Europe, you may place three of your infantry there for free during the mobilize new units phase of your turn.

6. Colonial Garrison
World War II represents the height of the United Kingdom’s colonial empire. Two decades later the Commonwealth was a shadow of its world-spanning former self.
You begin the game with one additional industrial complex in any tan territory with an income value of at least 1. (You still can’t have more than one industrial complex in a territory.)

Japan National Advantages
1. Tokyo Express
The Japanese High Command used destroyer convoys to ferry infantry. Allied forces at Guadalcanal dubbed this the “Tokyo Express”.
Each of your destroyers may act as a transport for one infantry. These destroyers follow the same rules for loading and offloading units as transports do. Destroyers are still allowed to conduct shore bombardment if they have the "Combined Bombardment" weapons development even when unloading simultaneously.

2. Kamikaze Attacks
A terrifying development was the willingness of Japanese pilots to fly their planes directly into U.S. ships. They even developed “Flying Bombs” piloted by the soldiers inside.

At the start of a sea combat (both attack and defense qualify - but never on land), the Japanese player designates any number of his fighters (not bombers) as Kamikaze fighters. Your attacking air units may make a combat move without having to land in a friendly space afterward, using their full range of movement (4 regular, 6 with Long Range Air) to reach the target sea zone. In the first cycle of combat, Kamikazes hit in the opening fire step of combat (meaning, their casualties cannot hit back) - each Kamikaze specifies one specific enemy unit which it tries to hit (several Kamikazes could specify the same target unit, but they cannot call off an attack or change targets once conduct combat begins). Kamikazes hit on a 4 in attack and defense (5 on defense with Jets). Kamikazes cannot be hit by enemy units! Instead, they automatically die after the first cycle of combat, whether they have hit or not.

3. Kaiten Torpedoes
Like the Yokosuka MXY7 Ohka “flying bomb,” the kaiten torpedo had a human pilot inside. Once the pilot closed the hatch, he would never open it again.

At the start of a sea combat (both attack and defense qualify - but never on land), the Japanese player designates any number of his submarines as Kaiten torpedoes. In the first cycle of combat, Kaitens hit in the opening fire step of combat (meaning, their casualties cannot hit back) - each Kaiten specifies one specific enemy unit which it tries to hit (several Kaitens could specify the same target unit, but they cannot call off an attack or change targets once conduct combat begins). Kaitens hit on a 3 in attack and defense (4 in attack with SS). Kaitens cannot be hit by enemy units! Instead, they automatically die after the first cycle of combat, whether they have hit or not. Enemy destroyers have no effect on Kaitens.

If you have BOTH Kaitens and Kamikazes, you may use them in conjunction with each other per the above rules.

4. Most Powerful Battleships
The largest and most powerful battleships in history sailed under the Japanese flag. The Yamato and Musashi were never equalled by any other battleship.

Your battleships attack and defend on a 5.

5. Dug-In Defenders
Many Japanese troops defending Pacific islands elected to die in their bunkers rather than surrender.
All your infantry on islands defend on a 3.

6. Banzai Attacks
A fearsome rallying cry of the Imperial Japanese Army, “Banzai!” meant, “May you live ten thousand years.”
When you begin an attack with only infantry, all those infantry attack on a 2. This also applies to any amphibious assault in which all your attacking units in the land combat (other than those conducting shore bombardment) consist of only infantry."

United States National Advantages
1. Island Bases
MacArthur’s forces built many airbases on the islands they conquered. From these bases, they could launch attacks deeper into Japanese-held territory.
When moving your air units, you may treat island groups as part of the sea zones containing them. For example, a fighter (move 4) could travel from Midway to the East Indies in one turn, assuming your side controlled both island groups.

2. Chinese Divisions
The Chinese had three hundred divisions in 1942. President Roosevelt spent much of the war trying to get Chiang Kai-Shek to do something with them.
During your mobilize new units phase, you may place one of your infantry for free in one of the following territories if you control it: China, Sinkiang, or Kwangtung. This free unit is in addition to the group of units you just purchased.

3. Marines
“Send in the Marines!” was a popular U.S. rallying cry in World War II.
Your infantry attack on a 2 in the first cycle of the land combat portion of an amphibious assault. Even if supported by artillery, their attack remains 2.

4. Mechanized Infantry
With its fleet of trucks, the U.S. Army was the most mobile force of soldiers in World War II.
Your infantry have a move of 2 and may blitz as tanks do.

5. Fast Carriers
The U.S.S. Independence was the first of nine light carriers constructed in Cleveland-class cruiser hulls.
Your aircraft carriers have a move of 3.

6. Superfortresses
The B-29 Superfortress flew higher than any other plane in the U.S. arsenal.

The defender rolls two antiaircraft guns for each superfortress. The total of 2 die must add to 3 or less to shoot the superfortress down in the opening fire step.
Last edited by Larry on Tue Jun 08, 2004 8:44 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Larry
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Post by Larry » Sun May 23, 2004 9:04 am

The committee reviewing the rules provided in the gamebox has made a number of minor changes to help clarify the wording and intent of the rules as printed. We have made some substantive changes though too, for two purposes:

1) Clarification of the whole game move processes. Years of experience have taught us where problem areas occur, and transports cause the most difficulty.

2) Reworking of rules that seem to tilt the balance of the game (HB's, rockets and technology timing are the prime examples).

Game Process Changes

We have changed a number of rules that might have caused confusion or discord due to non-separation of the phases of a game.

The principal rules affecting the game are the opening sentences of the three core phases: combat movement; conduct combat; and, noncombat movement. Combat movement requires that you move only those pieces that will attack enemy units and/or that will attack(or in the case of transports - participate in the attack of) enemy spaces. Conduct combat is the phase when ALL rolling is done. Non-combat movement is the phase in which you may move any piece which did not move or participate in combat (air units are the SOLE exception).

The changed rules principally are the following:

I. Air units and Antiaircraft guns

1) Air units that participate in combat remain over the battle site until the conclusion of all combat for that round. They land in the non-combat phase of play. They are the ONLY pieces that may move in BOTH combat and noncombat phases.

2) Antiaircraft guns only fire during the conduct combat phase against air units that moved in the combat move phase. They do not fire at any air units moving in the noncombat move phase, whether just doing a noncombat move or returning from battle.

3) No units may move in the mobilise units phase. You can place new ftrs on YOUR existing carriers or on YOUR new carriers (if the carrier is in the sz adjacent to your IC).

II. Transports

Transports are often the most difficult pieces to understand for new players. We have simplified the rules for transports:

Case set 1

If you load a transport in the combat move phase, you must unload the newly loaded units in the same turn in combat, unless the transport is sunk or forced to retreat from a sea battle in its intended offloading zone.

Discussion. You cannot load a transport and then intentionally conduct only a sea battle with that transport. The unit moves in combat movement by boarding the transport. Since it can only board a transport in a friendly seazone, this would be a noncombat move unless the land unit follows through and offloads into a hostile territory. It is cargo only during the transport's movement. The land unit does not participate in any sea combat (it may be lost, but it does not count as a combat loss).

Case set 2

If you have unit(s) already aboard and move the transport to conduct a sea battle, the land units are just cargo (at least until the transport reaches the sea combat zone.) You must declare before you roll any battles whether you intend to offload any land unit (zero, one or two could offload in combat) from this transport into an amphibious assault. If you do not offload any units in combat though (and the transport participated in sea combat), you may NOT offload any units in noncombat as the transport has exhausted its move for the turn in the combat phases.

Case set 3

If you are loading units in noncombat, you may offload zero, one or none in that phase (but still only into one territory)

Case set 4

If you have units already aboard and are offloading units in noncombat, you may offload zero, one or two in that phase (but still only into one territory)

Game Balance Changes

The principal changes are:

1) Tech rolls take effect in the mobilise units phase of your turn (effectively delaying their implementation by one turn)

2) For Heavy bombers you roll two die. You pick the most favorable roll of the two (whether on attack, sbr, or defense.)

3) The COMBINED total of any bombing raid and rocket attack for a turn is limited to the value of the territory under attack.

These three changes should prevent SeaLion or a US bomber buildup strategy.

The other major balance change is to provide for a moderate Victory City condition of 9 VC's (recommended for tournament and ladder play, where time is not a critical factor).

There are quite a few changes to the optional rules.

Thanks to all.

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Guerrilla Guy
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Post by Guerrilla Guy » Wed Jun 23, 2004 8:35 pm

Is it true to say that you could load a Tank before an Infantry even though it says an Infantry and any other land units? Sorry if it is a dumb question... It just keeps on tripping me up...

GG
"We're airborne. We’re supposed to be surrounded."

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DY
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Post by DY » Fri Jun 25, 2004 4:17 pm

Guerrilla Guy wrote:Is it true to say that you could load a Tank before an Infantry even though it says an Infantry and any other land units? Sorry if it is a dumb question... It just keeps on tripping me up...

GG
Yes. This is covered in the official FAQ at www.avalonhill.com

Basically the "maximum capacity" of a transport is one infantry unit plus any other land unit.

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TMTM
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Post by TMTM » Wed Dec 29, 2004 4:27 am

PHASE 6:
MOBILIZE NEW UNITS

There is a part in the rules... that you can put in new naval units in a area that has enemy naval units... what happens say UK puts in a new AC in a area with a German Destroyer. Then on Russia's next turn they attack the German destoryer and plan to land on the UK AC... is the UK's new AC to be in the battle? or is it just between Russia and Germany?

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Larry
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Post by Larry » Sat Jan 01, 2005 4:56 pm

Comments noted
Your Question TMTM - The UK CV was in the sea zone at the outbreak of the battle so YES the new UK CV can and is involved in the battle. Why would it not be?

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TMTM
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Post by TMTM » Sun Jan 02, 2005 2:47 am

I guess why I wondered is... it would give the UK units a double fire power.

Example of Turns:

UK1 builds 1 AC 2 subs in a zone with a German Destroy

Russian 2: attacks that German destoryer with 1 fighter.
So during this attack phase... roll dice for both the Russian fighter and the UK's AC and 2 Subs? Or are they to be only considered as possible casualties? Lets say they get to roll also... and those subs make a hit. The UK player on his turn can then use those same subs or naval units in another attack?

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